We’ve just scratched the surface

My 5 Words? We’ve just scratched the surface!

cc licensed ( BY NC ND ) flickr photo shared by Preserved Light by Caillum Smith

It’s been a fun couple of weeks! I have learned so much in ETMOOC already and I know we have just scratched the surface. However, over time, glaciers that scratch the surface of the earth create breathtaking beauty!

Although I am enjoying all the tips and tools, I am really looking forward to developing relationships and becoming a better teacher. Most of this post is what I learned from the Intro and Advanced Blogging webinars and the links people posted during the chat of the webinar. I intend for it to be a used to support a group of teachers that are new to blogging along with this presentation.

Link to others in posts.

  • It is a professional courtesy.
  • The net is a net because of the links. Hyperlinking to where you got your inspiration or to give more detail establishes a chain of information for anyone to follow without creating excessively long posts.
  • It creates pingbacks so that even if you don’t comment on a post, the blogger knows you have read their post and found something of worth.

Create an about.me page–about.me/susancampo

  • A great way to establish your “brand” and provide your PLN with an easy way to find you.
  • My background image is from a family trip on an Alaskan cruise last summer.

Use Flipboard on your iPad or tablet. Sue Waters describes it here. (Scroll down…way down.)

  • I love it for combining all the streams of information.
  • It is very visual, but also allows you to interact with your PLN by commenting, retweeting, etc.
  • I like how I can also mix in my Facebook feed, where I only connect to family and close friends, without linking Facebook with my professional communities.
20130129-124354.jpgImages are very important in blog posts.
  • Seeing how blogs are presented in Flipboard, Google+ and Google Reader, I understand how important it is to have a visual to accompany your post.
  • Of course, images or other media can be the whole post. Try out this “An image in 5 words” activity to “kick start your blog”.

Easily find Creative Commons media and the meanings of all those CC licenses!

The most popular sites for images:

The most popular sites for clip art:

The most popular sites for sounds and music:

Easily create correct attributions for images you use.

  • Use Compfight either as a plugin in your WordPress blog or directly on their website. Edublogs runs a filter that prevents inappropriate image searches.
  • Also ImageCodr will create the HTML code for a very unobtrusive attribution for Flickr images. (see below)

Comment often and add some html code to comments.

  • Comment boxes do not allow for formatting. Adding some HTML code allows you to use bold, italics, etc. and to hyperlink to other pages/blogs.
  • Thanks go out to someone in the Advanced Blogging webinar who shared a link to Mrs. Yollis’ post. If the kids in Grade 2 and 3 can do it, so can we! Try it out in the comments below!

Write and learn

Between participating in the Blogging webinar with Sue Waters as part of #etmooc yesterday and a Lance King workshop today, I’ve been immersed in some great ideas lately. During the webinar, we were encouraged to blog about our learning and experiences from etmooc. Sue suggested we write for ourselves and not to worry about what our readers wanted to read. Today, Lance King’s declaration that “failure is just feedback” was a further push. “Just write,”  I said to myself. Write and learn.

I have been working with teachers as they develop class blogs and eportfolios with their students and have done some blogging but I struggle with blogging consistently. Part of what stops me from sharing my reflections is that I work with teachers and not students. I feel torn between the desire to share my struggles, insights and reflections, and the privacy of the teachers I work with. Occasionally my role as an instructional technology resource teacher, and the “board office” policies that I am to represent, conflicts with my own beliefs and/or some teachers’ perspectives.

I have admired other bloggers who are administrators or other leaders who successfully blog and respectfully manage all these factors. For example, Erin Paynter is a vice-principal in Ottawa who has very reflective, respectful posts. Shelly Wright is a high school teacher and consultant from Saskatchewan whose teaching practice and reflections are inspirational. She pushes the envelope but is honest, thoughtful and respectful.

I hope to connect with many more honest, thoughtful and respectful teachers during etmooc and beyond. And I hope to write more. Write and learn.

Meeting teachers where they are.

These images of Helen’s keys illustrate how busy and multidimensional teachers’ lives are. To be effective, instructional technology support has to take this into account.

At a few of the schools I support I have established a bimonthly coaching day. Teachers know that one day every two weeks I will be available for one-on-one or small group support on the teachers’ prep period or lunch. The response has been very positive. Teachers really appreciate being listened to and involved in their learning. It’s specific, personal and timely. Also, I can check in with the teacher on the next coaching day to follow-up and address any issues.

One of the biggest difficulties I have when facilitating larger group instructional technology workshops is that there is such a range in teachers’ skills and exposure to technology. Some teachers only need an overview and then time to explore. Others need more specific and ongoing instructions. I always want to honour people’s time by making it relevant to their subject area and experience. In addition, if the technology or computers are not readily available in their classroom, teachers find it difficult to practice their new skills and frustrating to have to relearn later. One size fits all is not appropriate for students or teachers.

Every time I work with a teacher, I learn something new. Teachers know their students and their subjects. They can see the possibilities; they just need support to realize their vision. Often, a teacher presents me with a situation I have not encountered before and we work together to solve it. Other times, teachers are surprised that I don’t know about a website or technique. I leave every coaching session with more to offer the next teacher. Working with Helen today reinforced the value of these coaching sessions and I finally got time to learn how to use a Flash plug in to display a (non compatible) document camera image in Smart Notebook. Tomorrow, I’ll show Nancy–Thanks Helen!

Blogging with Manny

I am really enjoying working with “chefmanny” on his new blog! He has so much experience and passion for his students and food.  Check out this goat cheese and roasted pepper appetizer! 

His students recently competed in the Ontario Skills Competition in Waterloo and received THIRD PLACE in Ontario! Congrats to the Turner Fenton Hospitality department.

Check out Manny’s blog at: chefmanny.edublogs.org

Rainbow Rose

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This is a test post to use my iphone to post. BYOD is becoming more prevalent in our schools as we move to widespread wireless access. It’s an exciting time in education!

What quote defines you?

I am always interested in reading the quotes that people put in their email signatures. It seems to be a way to define yourself, a logo or mantra. I have never been able to choose just one quote because I feel like a different person each day. So I have just a plain name, title and contact information in my signature. I’m looking for a good quote though. Any suggestions?

The quotes below are gleaned from the last two days of emails.*

“The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.” Alvin Toffler

“A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.”  Winston Churchill

“Everyday, everywhere, our children spread their dreams beneath our feet. And we should tread softly.”  Sir Ken Robinson 

“There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats.” Albert Schweitzer.

” Education is a social process. Education is growth. Education is not a preparation for life; Education is life itself.”      John Dewey

“I am convinced that the best learning takes place when the learner takes charge…” –Seymour Papert

 “Happiness does not come from doing easy work but from the afterglow of satisfaction that comes after the achievement of a difficult task that demanded our best.”  ~  Theodore Isaac Rubin 

‘Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it, no matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and your own common sense.’ Buddha

Sent from my iPhone

*I have not verified these quotes…just copied them from the emails.

Poetry Contests

These poetry contests might inspire the next Earle Birney or Margaret Atwood…

Canada Writes Poetry Prize

Sponsor: CBC Books

Deadline: May 1, 2012

Prizes: First Prize $6000 + publication, 4 Second Prizes of $1000 + publication

Topic: Any

Format: Poetry, 400-600 words

Open to: Canadians of all ages, $25 entry fee

Link: http://www.cbc.ca/books/canadawrites/literaryprizes/poetry/

Kisses and Popsicles Spring Poetry Contest: 

Sponsor: Pandora’s Collective

Deadline: May 15, 2012

Prizes: Varies between $30 and $100 depending on age, and publication

Topic: Any

Format: Poetry, Maximum lines is 50

Open to: All countries, all ages (3 age categories), $3-$5 per entry

Link: http://www.pandorascollective.com/what-we-do/contests

Refugees and Human Rights Child and Youth Poetry Contest

Sponsor: COSTI Immigrant Services

Deadline: May 16, 2012

Prizes: 3 First Prizes of $200.00 each.  3 Second and Third Prizes of $100.00 each.

Topic: Refugees and Human Rights

Format: An original poem 24 or fewer lines

Open to: Canadian, Grades 4-12, no entry fee

Link: http://www.costi.org/sys/anno_detail.php?id=41341